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A Guide to Plant-Based Protein

A Guide to Plant-Based Protein

Whether you’re switching to a plant-based diet or would simply like to reduce your meat intake, the following guide can help you develop a well-balanced diet and give you some ideas for how to incorporate plant-based sources of protein into your everyday meals!

 

QUINOA

Quinoa, which is usually referred to as an ancient grain, is a source of complete protein and is high in magnesium, fiber, and iron. While there are over 1,800 types of quinoa, the three most common types are white, black, and red quinoa.

Protein: 8 g per 1 cup cooked

How to Prepare: Use 1 cup water to half a cup quinoa. Bring to a boil, then turn down heat and cover and cook for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, remove the pot from heat and let stand for 5 minutes, covered.

Uses:

Side dish

Base of a grain bowl

Pilaf

Addition to a salad

Hot cereal (by adding milk, fruit, nuts, etc.)

 

OATS

Oats are known to have many health benefits, which includes balancing blood sugar and cholesterol levels. They are rich in fiber and vitamins and are a good source of protein.

Protein: 6 g per 1 cup cooked

How to Prepare: Use 1 cup water or almond milk to ½ cup dry oats. Boil the liquid and stir in the oats. Cook about 5 minutes over medium heat, stirring occasionally.

Uses:

Oatmeal/porridge

Granola

Breakfast cookies

Overnight oats

 

LENTILS

Lentils not only have a high protein and fiber content, but are relatively inexpensive as well. Their texture makes them the perfect substitute for meat in recipes such as tacos, Shepherd’s Pie, and more!

Protein: 9 g per ½ cup cooked

How to Prepare: Use 3 cups liquid to 1 cup of dry lentils. Bring to a boil in a large saucepan or pot. Then, cover tightly and lower heat. Simmer for 15-20 minutes or until tender.

Uses:

Soups and Dal

Additive to salads

Meat substitute in recipes

 

BEANS

Beans are a good source of fiber and protein. Similarly to lentils, they can be used as a meat substitute in many classic dishes.

Protein: Approx. 7 g per ½ cup

How to Prepare: Soak the beans overnight. The next day, drain the soaked beans and rinse them gently under water. Put the beans in a pot and cover them with an inch of water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Then, lower heat and gently simmer the beans for one hour. After one hour, check for tenderness. Depending on the variety, the beans can take up to three hours.

Uses:

Soups

Salads

Burritos

Curry

Stir-Fry

Buddha Bowl

 

SEEDS

Seeds that are high in protein include sunflower, pumpkin, chia, hemp, and flax seeds. Seeds can also be a great source of Omega-3s, iron, and other nutrients.

Protein: Approx. 30 g per 1 cup

How to Prepare: Soak the seeds for 18-24 hours with sea salt. After they’re done soaking, dry them thoroughly by spreading them out in a single layer on a baking sheet and place in the oven on the lowest setting. Keep in oven until they are dry and crisp.

Uses:

Trail mix

Granola

Topping for oatmeal, yogurt, salads, and soups

 

NUTS

The best nuts for a plant-based diet include almonds, pistachios, and cashews. They also have heart-healthy fats and fiber that help you maintain a balanced diet.

Protein: Approx. 27 g per 1 cup

How to Prepare: Soak the nuts for 18-24 hours with sea salt. After they’re done soaking, dry them thoroughly by spreading them out in a single layer on a baking sheet and place in the oven on the lowest setting. Keep in oven until they are dry and crisp.

Uses:

Snack

Granola

Trail mix

Topping for oatmeal, yogurt, salads, and soups

 

EDAMAME

Edamame is the immature form of soybeans. They are typically found in pods and are a good source of iron and vitamins C and A.

Protein: 8.5 g per ½ cup

How to Prepare: 6 cups water to 2 cups edamame in pods

Uses:

Snack

Addition to salads, soups, and other recipes

 

 

 

 

SOURCES:

http://nutritionstripped.com/10-plant-based-proteins-eating/

https://www.healthline.com/health/food-nutrition/plant-based-protein#beans-chickpeas-and-lentils5

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-food/vegan-sources-of-protein/

http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-cook-quinoa-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-63344

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-food/delicious-ways-to-eat-lentils/

http://www.thekitchn.com/13-wonderful-ways-to-eat-your-oats-227179

https://the30clean.com/how-to-properly-prepare-nuts-and-seeds/



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